Friday, February 3, 2023

Going-to-the-Sun Road Construction Photo Collection Now Available

The Glacier National Park Conservancy recently announced that they assisted in the digitization of Glacier National Park’s photographic archives. One such collection highlights photos from the construction and dedication of Going-to-the-Sun Road. Here's what the GNPC posted on their website:
Glacier National Park’s archives contain a wealth of fascinating materials and valuable historic documents, but with no park museum to display historic artifacts, documents, and photos, few people laid eyes on these incredible resources. A major digitization effort in Glacier’s archives is changing that—and so far, the results are amazing!

A collection of historic photos from the construction and dedication of Going-to-the-Sun Road, now available to the public on the Montana Memory Project give a glimpse into the harrowing and spectacular lives of those building this famous road.

With the support of our donors, the Glacier National Park Conservancy was able to support a Museum Technician position to work with these photographs. GNPC also funded work by the park librarian to add metadata to the images, putting them in their proper historical context.
To view the collection, please click here.




Jeff
HikinginGlacier.com
TetonHikingTrails.com
RockyMountainHikingTrails.com

Ramble On: A History of Hiking
Exploring Glacier National Park
Exploring Grand Teton National Park

Wednesday, February 1, 2023

Announcement: "Ramble On" To Be Published on February 7th

I’m very excited to announce that “Ramble On: How Hiking Became One of the Most Popular Outdoor Activities in the World” will be officially published on Amazon next Tuesday, February 7th!

As previously mentioned on this blog, this new book is an expanded edition of "Ramble On: A History of Hiking," which was published in 2018. So you may be asking, "why publish a 2nd edition?" Great question! Here are a few answers:

* The new edition builds upon the first edition of my book to reflect additional research, to expand more broadly on a few topics, and to discuss new information. For example, since publication of the first edition, a compelling new theory has emerged as to why Darby Field made his two ascents of Mt. Washington in 1642, which directly challenges the legend of him being the first hiker in America.

* I thought it was important to chronicle in more detail the crucial role the multi-generational Crawford family of New Hampshire played in the development of hiking. The new edition dives more deeply to examine the significance of this family, and the many historical events that surrounded them as hiking blossomed in America.

* I also wanted to provide a better understanding of how the social trends that prevailed during the Age of Enlightenment influenced art, literature, religion and thought, which allowed hiking to bloom and eventually flourish.

* Finally, the 2nd edition delves deeper into the first female hikers and mountaineers, while showing how women eagerly adopted these fledgling outdoor pursuits.

In the meantime, you can find more information about the book by clicking here.

Thank you!



Jeff
HikinginGlacier.com
TetonHikingTrails.com
RockyMountainHikingTrails.com

Ramble On: A History of Hiking
Exploring Glacier National Park
Exploring Grand Teton National Park

Tuesday, January 31, 2023

Glacier National Park 2023 Vehicle Reservations Open February 1

Glacier National Park reminds visitors that 2023 vehicle reservations become available on Recreation.gov starting February 1, 2023, at 8 a.m. Mountain Time.

Vehicle reservations will be available on Recreation.gov through two types of booking windows; approximately four months in advance and 24-hours in advance. The 24-hour advanced reservations will become available starting May 25 at 8 a.m. Mountain Time.

Reservations are required for Going-to-the-Sun Road west side entrances and the North Fork area May 26 through September 10, 2023, from 6 a.m. to 3 p.m. Reservations for Going-to-the-Sun Road are good for three days, and North Fork reservations are good for one day.

Beginning July 1 through September 10, 2023, a vehicle reservation will be required to access Going-to-the-Sun Road from the Rising Sun check point, six miles west of the St. Mary Entrance. Visitors will have access to the St. Mary Visitor Center and park shuttle outside of the vehicle reservation area.

New in 2023, one reservation per vehicle per valley will be required to access Two Medicine and Many Glacier valleys on the east side of the park from July 1 through September 10 from 6 a.m. to 3 p.m. Reservations on Recreation.gov open for these areas starting March 1, 2023, at 8 a.m. Mountain Time and are good for one day.

Each of the specified areas of the park will require a separate reservation. Visitors will need to set up an account on Recreation.gov to obtain reservations and are encouraged to do so prior to the day reservations open. The only cost associated with booking a reservation is a $2 Recreation.gov processing fee.

Visitors may also make a reservation through the Recreation.gov call center. Contacting the call center does not provide an advantage towards securing a reservation but provides an alternative for those who don’t have access to the internet or are not as familiar with technology. Call centers are open every day from 8 a.m. to 10 p.m. Mountain Time and the processing fee remains $2. The following lines are available for callers:
• Reservation line (Toll-Free) - (877) 444-6777
• Reservation line (International) - (606) 515-6777
• Reservation line (TDD) - (877) 833-6777

In addition to a vehicle reservation, each vehicle entering the park is required to have an entrance pass for any entry point into the park. These passes could include any one of the following: a $35 vehicle pass, good for seven days; a valid Interagency Annual/Lifetime Pass; or a Glacier National Park Annual Pass.

Visitors with lodging, camping, transportation, or commercial activity reservations within Going-to-the-Sun Road corridor, Many Glacier, or Two Medicine can use their reservation for entry instead of a $2 reservation to gain access to the portion of the park for which they have a reservation.



Jeff
HikinginGlacier.com
TetonHikingTrails.com
RockyMountainHikingTrails.com

Ramble On: A History of Hiking
Exploring Glacier National Park
Exploring Grand Teton National Park

Monday, January 30, 2023

Teton Pass Corridor Study Meeting

The Federal Highway Administration (FHWA), in coordination with Teton County, Wyoming, the Wyoming Department of Transportation, and the U.S. Forest Service, is hosting an in-person public meeting on Wednesday, February 15th.

The project team has been working to finish the baseline conditions report and develop a range of options for improving safety and recreational access along the corridor to consider. The team will present these considered projects and improvements along the corridor in poster form and look forward to getting valuable in person feedback from the public so please attend at your convenience.

Right now, there are several great hikes along this corridor, such as Mt. Glory and Black Canyon Overlook from Teton Pass, as well as Coal Creek Meadows, located on the west side of Teton Pass.

The venue for the meeting will be at the Old Wilson Schoolhouse at 5655 Main St. in Wilson, WY from 5:00 to 7:00 PM.



Jeff
HikinginGlacier.com
TetonHikingTrails.com
RockyMountainHikingTrails.com

Ramble On: A History of Hiking
Exploring Glacier National Park
Exploring Grand Teton National Park

Saturday, January 28, 2023

Understanding the Nuances of Winter Recreation Can Save a Life, even that of Wildlife

Winter in Northern Colorado ushers in different types of recreation that residents and visitors alike wait all year to enjoy. Whether skiing, snowshoeing, hiking, or biking, people take full advantage of the opportunities that freshly fallen snow provides. Just as recreation is different in the winter, so is wildlife behavior and the types of encounters people may experience.

According to the Colorado Search and Rescue Association, there are approximately 3,000 search and rescue incidents in Colorado per year. Around 400,000 volunteer hours are put in annually for training, missions, and other activities. Often, rescues occur on public lands during the winter when visitors are unprepared for changing weather conditions or unexpected trail conditions, have navigation issues, or encounter wildlife.

Northern Colorado public land managers collaborated to release a video series highlighting avalanche awareness, ice safety, winter gear necessities for the pack and vehicle, and tips for safely interacting with wildlife. These videos will be found in the coming months on the participating agencies’ social media accounts.

View the winter recreation video series for helpful tips in English and Spanish. Here's one on avalanche awareness:



See a list of winter recreation tips from Northern Colorado land management agencies. These messages are part of a broader effort by eight agencies collaborating on ways to address the challenges of high visitation and a growing population in northern Colorado’s foothills and mountains. Called NoCo PLACES 2050, this collaboration is committed to sustainable solutions, equitable actions, and beneficial land management practices for the long-term conservation of public lands in Colorado and the quality of the visitor experience. Learn about NoCo PLACES 2050.



Jeff
HikinginGlacier.com
TetonHikingTrails.com
RockyMountainHikingTrails.com

Ramble On: A History of Hiking
Exploring Glacier National Park
Exploring Grand Teton National Park