Friday, November 27, 2015


Below is a short film by a rising 20-year old professional photographer by the name of Andrew Studer. The film, called "Restless", was made with 85,000 photos shot over the course of 2 years while Studer hiked throughout the Pacific Northwest. This is from his website:
"Restless" explores the Pacific Northwest's dramatic and diverse locations through the art of timelapse. I decided to name the film what it is not only for the dynamic change a timelapse video is able to display, but also because of how it affected my lifestyle. Working on this film, I myself became 'restless.' I spent just about every weekend and often times school days backpacking, camping and exploring some of the most incredible places the Pacific Northwest has to offer. Shot in a little over two years, countless all nighters, camping trips and spontaneous trips to the mountains and an estimated 85,000 photos were put into to this film to make it what it is. I began filming just after I graduated high school and completed it shortly after deciding to leave college and devote myself to working full time as a freelance photographer/videographer. I know for a fact that working on this helped me see where my true passions lied and was key in giving me to confidence to enter full time into the freelance world.

RESTLESS from Andrew Studer on Vimeo.


Monday, November 23, 2015

Help Count Birds for Science During Audubon's Annual Christmas Bird Count

Now in its 116th year, the National Audubon Society’s annual Christmas Bird Count will take place from December 14 through January 5. During the count, more than 72,000 volunteers from 2,400-plus locations across the Western Hemisphere record sightings of bird species with the data collected and submitted to Audubon for research on bird populations and environmental conditions.

For more than 100 years, Audubon's Christmas Bird Count, the longest-running wildlife census, has fueled science and conservation action. Each winter, citizen scientists gather in 15-mile-wide circles, organized by a count compiler, and count every bird they see or hear. Their hard work provides valuable insights into population trends for many species that would otherwise go unnoticed and undocumented.

“New tools, including apps, smartphones and map-based technologies, are making it easier than ever for anyone to be a citizen scientist,” said Audubon President and CEO David Yarnold. People who watch birds are seeing changes. By recording all those observations, they're contributing the information that's needed to make a difference. I couldn’t be prouder of the volunteers who contribute each year.”

Last year’s count shattered records. A total of 2,462 counts and 72,653 observers tallied over 68 million birds of 2,106 different species. Counts took place in all 50 states, all Canadian provinces and over 100 count circles in Latin America, the Caribbean and the Pacific Islands. Four counts took place in Cuba and new counts in Mexico, Nicaragua and Colombia partook for the first time.

The Audubon Christmas Bird Count began in 1900 when Dr. Frank Chapman, founder of Bird-Lore – which evolved into Audubon magazine – suggested an alternative to the holiday “side hunt,” in which teams competed to see who could shoot the most birds. 116 years of counting birds is a long time, but the program somehow brings out the best in people, and they stay involved for the long run. Remarkably the entire existence of the program can still be measured with the involvement of two ornithologists—Chapman, who retired in 1934, and Chan Robbins, who started compiling in 1934 and still compiles and participates to this day. The old guard may someday move on, but up-and-coming young birders will fill the ranks. And so the tradition continues.

The Audubon Christmas Bird Count is a citizen science project organized by the National Audubon Society. There is no fee to participate and the quarterly report, American Birds, is available online. Counts are open to birders of all skill levels and Audubon’s free Bird Guide app makes it even easier to chip in. For more information and to find a count near you visit


Saturday, November 21, 2015

Grand Teton Rangers Investigating Illegal Take of Moose

Park rangers are working in partnership with the Wyoming Game and Fish Department and conducting an investigation regarding an illegal take of a moose within the boundaries of Grand Teton National Park.

Wyoming Game and Fish Wardens were contacted over the weekend by a participant of the park's elk reduction program who reported a calf moose was mistakenly shot. State game wardens seized the meat, cited the individual for taking a moose without a license, and contacted park rangers. The meat was donated to local families in need.

Park rangers are following up on the incident and conducting an investigation.

Park visitors and neighbors are encouraged to report any information that may be connected to poaching or other wildlife-related incidents happening within the park boundaries. Information may be reported to:

• Teton Interagency Dispatch Center 307-739-3301 or 911, OR

• Wyoming Game and Fish Department Poaching Hotline 1-877-WGFD-TIP (1-877-943-3847) or 1-307-777-4330 for out-of-state calls.

Park rangers and state game wardens follow up on all information received and many times the information may lead to successful prosecution of violators. Individuals submitting information can remain anonymous, and may be eligible for a reward.

Park rangers continue to intensively monitor and patrol elk reduction areas within the park to ensure compliance with rules and regulations, interpret the elk reduction program to visitors, and provide participants with information on local conditions associated with this wildlife management program. Failure to comply with the elk reduction program rules and regulations may result in a fine, confiscation of a harvested animal, forfeiture of permit, and possible denial of future participation in the program.

An information line for the 2015 elk reduction program is available at 307.739.3681. A brochure on elk ecology and a map showing locations open to these special permit hunters is available online.


Friday, November 20, 2015

National Park Service Unveils 100th Anniversary Commemorative Coin Designs

Designs for commemorative coins honoring the 100th anniversary of the National Park Service (NPS) were unveiled today during a ceremony at the Department of the Interior. NPS Director Jonathan B. Jarvis and National Park Foundation (NPF) President and Chief Executive Officer Will Shafroth joined Treasurer of the United States Rosie Rios for the unveiling.

Public Law 113-291 authorizes a three-coin program of $5 gold, $1 silver and half-dollar clad coins with designs emblematic of the 100th anniversary of the National Park Service.

Pricing for the National Park Service Commemorative Coins will include surcharges—$35 for each gold coin, $10 for each silver coin, and $5 for each half-dollar clad coin—which are authorized to be paid to the NPF. The funds are to be used for projects that help preserve and protect resources under the stewardship of the NPS and promote public enjoyment and appreciation of these resources.

"When fully realized, the potential impact derived from the commemorative coin sales will be tremendous," said Shafroth. "The funds will improve trails, introduce more young people to the parks, and connect our citizens to the history and culture of our nation."

The gold coin obverse (heads side) features John Muir and Theodore Roosevelt with Yosemite National Park’s Half Dome in the background. Inscriptions are "LIBERTY," "2016" and "IN GOD WE TRUST." United States Mint Sculptor-Engraver Don Everhart designed and sculpted the obverse.

The gold coin reverse (tails side) features the NPS logo, with the inscriptions "UNITED STATES OF AMERICA," "E PLURIBUS UNUM" and "$5." Everhart also designed and sculpted the reverse.

The silver coin obverse features Yellowstone National Park’s Old Faithful geyser and a bison, with the inscriptions "LIBERTY," "NATIONAL PARK SERVICE CENTENNIAL," "IN GOD WE TRUST" and "1916-2016." United States Mint Sculptor-Engraver Joseph Menna designed and sculpted the obverse.

The silver coin reverse depicts a Latina Folkl√≥rico dancer and the NPS logo, representing the multi-faceted cultural experience found in America’s national parks. Inscriptions are "UNITED STATES OF AMERICA," "E PLURIBUS UNUM," "$1" "HERITAGE," "CULTURE” and "PRIDE." The reverse was designed by Artistic Infusion Program (AIP) artist Chris Costello and sculpted by United States Mint Sculptor-Engraver Jim Licaretz.

The clad half-dollar obverse features a hiker discovering the majesty of the wilderness and a small child discovering a frog hiding in ferns, celebrating the diversity and breadth of the NPS. Inscriptions are "LIBERTY," "2016," "IN GOD WE TRUST," "1916" and "NATIONAL PARK SERVICE." The reverse was designed by AIP artist Barbara Fox and will be sculpted by United States Mint Sculptor-Engraver Michael Gaudioso.

The clad half-dollar reverse features the NPS logo, with the inscriptions "UNITED STATES OF AMERICA," "E PLURIBUS UNUM," "HALF DOLLAR," "STEWARDSHIP" and "RECREATION." The reverse was designed by AIP artist Thomas Hipschen and sculpted by United States Mint Sculptor-Engraver Charles L. Vickers.

The United States Mint will announce the coins’ release date and additional pricing information prior to their release in 2016. The commemorative coin is one of many incredible ways to celebrate the 2016 centennial.

Sign up to receive information about the coin sales kick off and view the coin designs at


Thursday, November 19, 2015

Glacier's Early Days

Below is a video clip from Finley-Holiday's Centennial Edition Glacier National Park DVD. This short video of the early days of Glacier National Park combines some very cool historical photos and video clips, as well as some contemporary views of the park:

If this video has inspired you to visit Glacier next year, you should note that the best ways to see the park is to take a hike along one of the many hiking trails that meander throughout the park. Prospective visitors may also want to note that our hiking website also offers a wide variety of accommodation listings and other things to do to help with all your vacation planning.


Tuesday, November 17, 2015

National Parks Adventure - The Movie Trailer

Coming to a theater near you.... This is from the movie website:
As America gets ready to celebrate the 100th anniversary of the National Park Service next year, National Parks Adventure takes audiences on the ultimate off-trail experience into America’s great outdoors. Immersive IMAX® 3D cinematography takes viewers soaring over red rock canyons, up craggy mountain peaks that touch the clouds and into other-worldly realms found within America’s most legendary outdoor playgrounds. Join world-famous climber Conrad Anker, adventure photographer Max Lowe, and artist Rachel Pohl as they hike, climb and adventure across America’s majestic and treasured parks in an action-packed celebration of the wild places that belong to us all.
National Parks Adventure opens February 12, 2016 in select IMAX®, IMAX 3D® and other giant-screen theaters. Looks to be a pretty awesome movie!

Want more? Here's another clip from the movie:


Thursday, November 12, 2015

Scrambling: Risk Assessment

Yesterday we published a video that discusses managing objective hazards that are found while scrambling, a backcountry skill that every hiker should understand. Today, in the final video in this week's series on scrambling, discusses risk assessment: